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Marnies Melodies
Lubbock vocalist for weddings and other special evants

Wildcat Woodworking
Custom woodworking - distinctive pieces of furniture and cabinetry of the highest quality
 
Wildcat Tool
Small engine repair service on most brands of power equipment




In late 2001, McAlister Park was selected as the site for Legacy Play Village, a three-story public playground the Junior League of Lubbock hoped to build.  A Junior League committee considered locations at 16 parks and 15 private or commercial sites before choosing McAlister Park.

 

The 30,000-square-foot wooden playground was built by volunteers on 11/2 acres of the 272-acre city park bounded by Brownfield Highway (U.S. 62/82), Spur 327 and Frankford Avenue.

 

The playground site is at the western end of the park near three youth baseball fields, which are part of Phase I of park developments funded by $1.7 million from a 1999 bond package. Phase I included concession stands, restrooms, bleachers and a parking lot.

 

The Junior League had unveiled the playground project, part of its city beautification efforts, at a town-hall style meeting in May 2001.

 

Contruction began in October 2002.  It was truly a community project, from the local children who gave ideas about how to incorporate South Plains history and area landmarks in its design to the many donors and volunteers who have helped plan and pay for it to the local residents of all ages — including children — and from all walks of life who participated in the actual construction of the play village.

 

It is a playground unlike any that Lubbock has ever seen. It is three stories tall, constructed of wood and have a unique South Plains flavor.

 

And, best of all, it is free!

 

The city of Lubbock donated the land and insures the play village along with city assets because it is cheaper to insure it that way. But the Friends of Legacy Play Village, a nonprofit entity established to oversee the park, reimburses the city for the actual insurance costs. The residents of Lubbock acquired a great asset with virtually no expenditure of taxpayer dollars.